Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Autolite/Motorcraft 2100/2150 Theory of Operation

  1. #11
    Uncensored Hypocrite stevedmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    VIN
    16510
    Posts
    5,482
    Nah. We just sprayed it down real good.
    Rest assured, we have a backup of Farrar's car blog and it will be restored in the near future. (Steve Rice - March 2016)
    Rest assured, we have a backup of Shep's posts and all of them will be restored in the near future. (Steve Rice - March 2017)

  2. #12
    Bill may not be much, but when he rebuilds a carb, he rebuilds a carb.

    Farrar has got to stop cracking his throttle plates open so far. Cracking a 2100's throttle plates open too far definitely leads to idle issues and hard shutoffs because 2100's use the throttle plates themselves (sweeping past slots in the throttle bores) to switch between idle and throttle circuits. As long as Farrar is cracking his plates open so far he is going to have problems.

    Of course FWIW: Jeff Dickey didn't even put a kit in his carb -- just pulled one off a junkyard donor and stuck it on. He may have sprayed off the exterior.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Last edited by Greasy DeLorean Mechanic; 08-19-2013 at 04:38 PM.

  3. #13
    Yet another advantage of 2100 carburetors is that you can clean out the idle air jets with a guitar string.

  4. #14
    Do you mean the air bleeds? Idle circuit uses the same metering jets as the throttle circuit. Full throttle enrichment valve ("power valve") bypasses the jets, but it dumps into the same wells underneath them.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  5. #15
    With the number of 2100's in the community increasing, some adjustment pictures may be helpful:

    First & foremost, read the theory of operation document at the beginning of this thread.

    On one side of the carb is the choke mechanism. Biggest adjustment on this mechanism is the choke cap. This is a time adjustment -- it determines how quickly the choke spring inside expands, opening the choke plate and stepping down fast idle (both are connected to the choke mechanism). If your carb is warming up too quickly, loosen the three hold down screws and turn the cap counterclockwise. If your carb is taking too long to warm up, loosen the three hold down screws and turn the cap clockwise:

    2100ChokeFastIdleAdjustment.jpg

    Also pictured in that side view is the fast idle screw. This screw rides on a progressive step down cam turned by the choke mechanism as the spring inside the cap expands. It is attached to the throttle plate shaft. When the fast idle cam is at its greatest step, the throttle plates will be cracked most open. When the fast idle cam is at its least step, the throttle plates will be cracked least open. When the choke is fully warmed up, the screw will fall off the cam altogether and rest underneath it -- this is why you have to slightly depress the accelerator pedal when starting the engine cold: fast idle screw prevents the cam, and the choke mechanism attached to it, from rotating back around. Turning the fats idle screw clockwise increases the amount the throttle plates are cracked open, turning the fast idle screw counterclockwise decreases the amount the throttle plates are cracked open. No joke: easiest way to turn this screw with the carb in place is with a dime (penny is too thick to fit into the slot). This is what the fast idle screw looks like from the back:

    2100FastIdleAdjustment.jpg

    The other choke mechanism adjustment is a screw that determines how far the choke plate closes relative to choke mechanism movement. Turning this screw clockwise decreases how far the choke plate closes, turning it counterclockwise increases how far the choke plate closes:

    2100ChokePlateScrew.jpg

    Setting the choke is a matter of:
    1) how long do you want the warmup period to last
    2) how high do you want idle RPM's during the warmup period
    3) how much choke action do you want during the warmup period

    Always start with the cap. That is what operates the choke mechanism. Fast idle and choke plate action are adjusted relative to movement of the choke mechanism. As stated, if the carb is taking too long to warm up, turn the choke cap clockwise. If the carb is warming up too quickly, turn the choke cap counterclockwise.

    If the engine is rev'ing too high during the warmup period, turn the fast idle screw out. If the engine isn't rev'ing high enough during the warmup period, turn the fast idle screw in.

    If the choke plate is staying too far closed during the warmup period, turn the choke plate adjusting screw in. If the choke plate is opening too much during the warmup period, turn the choke plate adjusting screw out.

    If you want a long period of fast idle, but need more airflow during that time, turn the choke cap counterclockwise and turn the choke plate adjusting screw in. If you want a short period of fast idle but need less air flow during that time, turn the choke plate clockwise and turn the choke plate adjusting screw out. Etc.

    On the other side of the carb is the throttle mechanism. It has two adjustments: curb idle screw and accelerator pump rod. The curb idle screw sets a limit to how far the throttle plates can close. Turning this screw out allows the throttle plates to close more fully. Turning this screw in prevents the throttle plates from closing fully. If the engine can not idle acceptably on the idle circuit alone (not enough mixture bypassing the throttle plates, or mixture bypassing the throttle plates not rich enough), turning this screw in can add a little throttle action to compensate. But don't go crazy -- throttle plates cracked too far open lead to hard engine shutoffs, and sometimes even dieseling (turning the curb idle screw too far in is just like sticky throttle plates that aren't closing well).

    Accelerator pump rod activates the accelerator pump. Moving this rod to a higher hole allows the pump diaphragm to squish more fuel out. Moving it to a lower hole limits decreases the amount of fuel squished out. If you are getting a noticeable engine stumble when transitioning from idle to throttle, move the accelerator pump rod to a higher hole. If the engine bogs down momentarily when transitioning from idle to throttle, move the accelerator pump rod to a lower hole:

    2100CurbIdleAcceleratorPumpAdjustment.jpg

    As the theory of operation document points out, misleadingly named "idle mixture screws" don't really determine idle fuel/air mixture (main metering jets do that), but rather how much of that mixture is allowed to bypass the throttle plates. Turning these screws out lets more of the idle mixture bypass closed throttle plates, turning them in decreases the amount of mixture that bypasses closed throttle plates. You want both screws to be turned a similar amount. As mentioned above, main carburetor jetting, engine vacuum, etc may not allow the idle mixture screws to bypass a fuel/air mixture suitable for smooth idle, in which case the curb idle screw can be used to crack the throttle plates open a little bit to compensate.

    One last adjustment: choke pulloff screw. On early model 2100's (Peugeot manifold), this screw is located under the integrated pulloff diaphragm. On later model 2100's (fabricated manifolds), this screw is located on the back of the pulloff mechanism. In both cases it works the same: determines how far the diaphragm is allowed to move, cracking the choke plate open. Turning the screw in decreases diaphragm movement, reducing choke plate cracking open. Turning the screw out allows more diaphragm movement, increasing choke plate cracking open:

    2100ChokePulloffAdjustment1.jpg 2100ChokePulloffAdjustment2.jpg

    Whenever I set up a carb from scratch, I leave the choke cap unplugged, turn the curb idle screw in far enough that I know the engine will run, start the engine, then set fast idle. I also adjust the choke plate screw and choke pulloff screws as necessary.

    Then I plug the choke cap in and adjust warmup time.

    After the engine is warmed up, I alternate between opening idle mixture screws and backing off the curb idle screw. In the best of all possible worlds the engine will idle just fine off the idle mixture screws alone with the curb idle screw fully backed off, but things such as primary jetting and engine vacuum characteristics sometimes require just a tad of curb idle action (like 1/4-1/2 turn).

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •