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Thread: Self Bleeders

  1. #1

    Self Bleeders

    Received a PM about my self bleeders:

    Engine compartment self bleeder is standard design, albeit self sourced from McMaster. I tapped my thermostat housing 1/8 NPT, but you can simply run a 1/8 NPT barb down the M10 threads until it binds up (that's what John Hervey's kit does):

    ThermostatBleeder.jpg

    Not visible is a 5/8x5/16x5/8 brass tee in the heater core outbound line that replaces the rust prone factory tee:

    BleederTee.jpg

    Radiator bleeder reroutes the *DOWNHILL* factory bleed line to the heater core return line:

    RadiatorBleeder1.jpg RadiatorBleeder2.jpg

    Again uses a 5/8x5/16x5/8 brass tee in the heater core line.

    Radiator bleed line of course is never pulled off -- it bleeds the radiator automatically.

    Original factory pipe with the bleed barb is replaced with a length of hose:

    RadiatorBleeder3.jpg

    Total cost of parts for both bleeders is probably less than $50 (1 1/4" NAPA hose is the most expensive single component, but it's *REALLY* good hose).

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Last edited by Greasy DeLorean Mechanic; 04-16-2015 at 08:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Tomorrow I am sending Chad all the brass bits necessary to make two self bleeders. He will need to supply hoses and clamps. I also do not have a piece of 1.25" hose to replace the factory bleeder pipe -- for now he'll just have to cap off the factory bleeder barb with a piece of hose and a bolt. I'll bring a hose to Dave & Julee's open house. Thermostat neck is tapped 10x1mm straight thread -- a 1/8 NPT barb threads in well enough to seal (look closely at Hervey's kit -- that's what he supplies). If someone can rustle up a thermostat housing I'll tap it 1/8 NPT and bring it too.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  3. #3
    As seen on TV! Dracula's Avatar
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    Given that I had a near catastrophic failure of the cooling fans; had to build a side-of-the-road replacement with my emergency wire and the clamps from my trickle charger, I'm very appreciative of anything that makes the cooling system function properly.

    Today constituted an emergency trip to DMCH to ensure that my silver piece of junk can make it to Louisiana.
    -Chad K.
    Previous owner of VINS: 6982, 1601, 1265, and 1269

    Dammit, Jim. I'm an undertaker, not a mechanic.

  4. #4
    As seen on TV! Dracula's Avatar
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    I've now installed 1/3 of the bleeder system; I'm waiting until I'm replacing the radiator to get to the ones on the heater lines.
    -Chad K.
    Previous owner of VINS: 6982, 1601, 1265, and 1269

    Dammit, Jim. I'm an undertaker, not a mechanic.

  5. #5
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    I dont see how teeing into the heater core line makes it self bleeding. the heater core is not the highest point in the system, the coolant reservoir is much higher.

  6. #6
    Heater core is higher than the radiator. Radiator self bleeds to the heater core return line, from which air is pushed to the back of the car/backside of the water pump.

    Note that there is no way to manually bleed the heater core (which also is a high point in the system -- second highest after the coolant expansion tank). Every single DeLorean ever built bleeds its heater core via coolant circulation alone. All we're doing to tee'ing into what is already taking place.

    I 100% guarantee this is the easiest way to bleed the radiator. All you do is add coolant and start the engine. I've been bleeding my radiator this way for more than a decade now (when I first bought my car in 2002 the bleeder barb snapped off the plastic channel radiator while trying to bleed it the "official" way -- I repaired the barb, but didn't trust pulling the hose off again, so came up with this alternative).

    You all are welcome to lay on the ground and get coolant in your face. I prefer something simpler, easier, and automatic.

    Note also that if you raise the front end of the car high enough air will get introduced into a fully bled system -- can I hear an "Amen" Dave McKeen? With a radiator self bleeder all you have to do is drive the car after lowering the front end and the system returns to an air-free state.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    Last edited by Greasy DeLorean Mechanic; 04-30-2015 at 02:56 PM.

  7. #7
    As seen on TV! Dracula's Avatar
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    I should say that I TRIED to install the self-bleeder today; little did I know that someone had previously tapped the hole for the brass barb out to 1/4" and threaded a brass adapter inside of it...

    I had to expand the hole to accept a 1/2" bolt and make do with an oversized barb from the hardware store...

    Once the JB Weld dries tomorrow, I should be good to go.
    -Chad K.
    Previous owner of VINS: 6982, 1601, 1265, and 1269

    Dammit, Jim. I'm an undertaker, not a mechanic.

  8. #8
    ?

    Which hole are you talking about?

    JB Weld has its place & purpose (I just used it to fix my angle drive), but make sure whatever you're using it to repair won't fail under stress. For example, I've never had much success tapping threads in JB Weld.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939

  9. #9
    As seen on TV! Dracula's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by content22207 View Post
    ?

    Which hole are you talking about?

    JB Weld has its place & purpose (I just used it to fix my angle drive), but make sure whatever you're using it to repair won't fail under stress. For example, I've never had much success tapping threads in JB Weld.

    Bill Robertson
    #5939
    The one on the thermostat housing. It was enlarged for a threaded brass reducer to allow the original bleeder screw to be reinstalled. I discovered it when it broke while I was trying to remove it.

    I drilled it out to install another brass barb, but I couldn't find one in the proper size so I'm adapting it to fit.

    IMG_20150430_225026231.jpg

    The barb isn't properly threaded; cross threaded and the wrong size, but it's not coming out. The JB Weld is to keep it from leaking. I'm ordering a replacement 1/8 barb and a new thermostat cover, but this should hold until it arrives.
    -Chad K.
    Previous owner of VINS: 6982, 1601, 1265, and 1269

    Dammit, Jim. I'm an undertaker, not a mechanic.

  10. #10
    Uncensored Hypocrite stevedmc's Avatar
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    That poor car sure has been tapped a lot.
    Rest assured, we have a backup of Farrar's car blog and it will be restored in the near future. (Steve Rice - March 2016)
    Rest assured, we have a backup of Shep's posts and all of them will be restored in the near future. (Steve Rice - March 2017)

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